An authentic replica of the ship in which Ibn Battuta sailed across the Indian Ocean.

Ibn Battuta Mall

Born in 1304, Abu Abdullah Mohammed Ibn Battuta left Morocco, his birthplace, when he was only 21 years old and traveled for almost 30 years, covering 75,000 miles (we’re talking about the pre-steam age).  He is the only medieval traveler who is known to have visited the lands of every Muslim ruler of his time.

Themed around the travels of this renowned 14th century Arabian explorer, the Ibn Battuta mall’s 6 courts reflect the most influential places he traveled to:

CHINA

An authentic replica of the ship in which Ibn Battuta sailed across the Indian Ocean.

PERSIA

 This beautifully hand-painted dome is a replica of the vaulted souks of old Persia. It is here where Ibn Battuta discovered a cultured and artistic society.
This beautifully hand-painted dome is a replica of the vaulted souks of old Persia. It is here where Ibn Battuta discovered a cultured and artistic society.

ANDALUSIA

 This Lion Fountain is an inspiration of the original Fountain of Lions of the Moor Fortress in Granada, Andalusia. The time is kept by water that regularly spurts from the mouths of eight lions.
This Lion Fountain is an inspiration of the original Fountain of Lions of the Moor Fortress in Granada, Andalusia. The time is kept by water that regularly spurts from the mouths of eight lions.

EGYPT

Walking through ancient Egypt.
Walking through ancient Egypt.
 Based on a 16th century manuscript, this 9-meter high exhibit is an exact replica of the Armillary Sphere, an ancient instrument used to study astronomy.
Based on a 16th century manuscript, this 9-meter high exhibit is an exact replica of the Armillary Sphere, an ancient instrument used to study astronomy.

INDIA

The elephant clock was a medieval Muslim invention by al-Jazari (1136–1206), consisting of a weight powered water clock in the form of an elephant. The various elements of the clock are in the housing on top of the elephant. They were designed to move and make a sound each half hour.
The elephant clock was a medieval Muslim invention by al-Jazari (1136–1206), consisting of a weight powered water clock in the form of an elephant. The various elements of the clock are in the housing on top of the elephant. They were designed to move and make a sound each half hour.

TUNISIA

Whitewashed stucco buildings with blue painted doors and windows recreate the picturesque narrow streets and souks of a typical African marketplace. This setting is further enhanced with streetlamps and lanterns hanging from walls supported by decorative brackets of Tunisian design.
Whitewashed stucco buildings with blue painted doors and windows recreate the picturesque narrow streets and souks of a typical African marketplace. This setting is further enhanced with streetlamps and lanterns hanging from walls supported by decorative brackets of Tunisian design.

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23 comments

  1. what a grand mall this must be to have such a fabulous presentation/display such as this. so enjoyed this marvelous post and photos.
    thank you

  2. Nice pictures. Do watch the new Ibn Battuta IMAX movie called “Journey to Mecca”; it’s both informative and interesting.

    The girls and I went to the mall for just an hour (during lunch break). Maybe when I go next time with Masood, we’ll watch that movie.

  3. This is an extraordinary place, beautifully photographed and presented and so lavish that Dubai is one of the few places in the world that could have afforded to build such an extravaganza.

  4. As ever, lovely, informative post! Wandering there must be a fascinating experience as it invokes glimpses of the past grandeur.

    Explore more! 🙂

  5. Amazing photos ma shaa Allah

    LOL at the Nadia Masood ship 🙂

    And my fave is the last one, I ihave been there many times, but it looks even cooler thru your lens (the roof)… in person it doesnt seem so realistic! Ma shaa Allah!

  6. Very good post. 🙂 Well presented… 🙂

    You get very good shoes at this mall – add that too. All my favourite shoe brands are there. 😉

    Cinema has bad food though – the nachos are better at Mall of Emirates… 🙁

  7. This is one of my favorite malls, it’s like hopping from one country to another in a breeze. Great photos and the commentaries are very informative.

  8. Its been over 3 yrs since the mall opened and i’ve not visited it. Thank you for the tour.

    It would be wonderful to read the travelogues of Ibn Battuta….seeing the medieval world through his eyes.

  9. Masha’allah, thanks for sharing such beautiful pictures! Rather incredible architecture, all housed under the same place. 🙂 I love how you embellish each picture with your signature; perfect fits for all. Fav. has to be the ship. ^^

  10. Worth visiting this place , interesting history & pictures r too gud …Espclly first one where ur name tag in that ship Looks kool sis 🙂

  11. Pretty huge mall. Looks a bit empty though! 😛

    Again, lovely pictures. Also, the photoshopping of your name on the sail of that ship was well done! I almost thought it was part of the ship lol.

    They had Dubai on the news today, on BBC. They were showing all those lovely malls and how they were built by poor Indians and Bangladeshis who are basically exploited. It was pretty sad to see it. I mean, such a nice city and such lovely monuments and yet there is this sad tale.

    anyways …

    I feel guilty for imposing my name on that ship, lol – but it looks nice, so there. Regarding the exploitation shown by BBC, there is news in the paper today for the Ministry to investigate BBC claims of labour violations.

  12. The photos are fantastic! I love ‘your’ ship *grin*

    I love the ship and that armillary sphere replica the best!~ Hard to choose since everything’s so interesting!

  13. Oh cool. We have an exhibit here in Toronto at the Science centre called the Sultans of Science. They have a small model of the elephant clock with a convoluted explanation. Very cool.

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